AG meeting 2017

Splinter Meeting HiRes

High-Resolution Solar Imaging, Spectroscopy, and Polarimetry - Recent Developments in Science and Instrumentation

Time: Wednesday September 20, 14:00-16:30 and 17:00-19:00

Convenors: Andreas Lagg1, Nazaret Bello Gonzalez2, Meetu Verma3, Rolf Schlichenmaier2, Horst Balthasar3

1 Max-Planck-Institute für Sonnensystemforschung, Göttingen
2 Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Freiburg
3 Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam

Many fundamental physical processes on the Sun can be traced back to mechanisms occurring on the smallest spatial scales. Prominent examples are the conversion of kinetic energy contained in the plasma motions by the excitation and dissipation of magneto-acoustic waves, the shuffling of the magnetic field with the subsequent re-organization by micro-flare activity, or the convective motions in quiet-Sun granules, penumbral laments and umbral dots. The understanding of these processes requires studies at highest spatial and temporal resolution. At the same time, the weak magnetic field in, e.g., quiet-Sun regions, or the details of the height stratification of the magnetic field vector requires measurements at highest polarimetric signal to noise ratio.

The availability of large solar telescopes, like the German GREGOR telescope on Tenerife, the Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma, or the balloon-borne observatory Sunrise, are currently boosting the scientific discoveries in small-scale processes occurring in the solar photosphere and the chromosphere. The development of sophisticated, new instrumentation combined with powerful adaptive optics systems and image reconstruction techniques allows for studies of these processes with unprecedented accuracy.

In this splinter session we want to discuss recent advances in this field of solar observations. We invite the participants to submit contributions presenting results of high-resolution observations, their theoretical background using, for example, magneto-hydrodynamical modeling, and also the development of new instrumentation and data analysis techniques. The session should strengthen the connection between scientists and instrument developers for a fruitful collaboration in future international solar physics projects like the European Solar Telescope.